4 Things to Keep in Mind when Creating Rules for your English School

There are lots of things to think about when making rules for your school.

 

In this blog, I’ll cover 5 things that every English school should think about

when making rules for class reservations. Specifically I’ll touch on what you

need to think about when making rules for when and how often students can

cancel their lesson. Also, what types of lessons they can take if they’re allowed

to take makeup lessons.

 

The answers to these questions really depend on the type of classes that you

are offering.

 

Remember, if you are too lenient, it will negatively affect your bottomline. If

you are too strict, you may scare students away.

 

A lot of what you choose to do also depends on how you market it. I’ve given a

few examples below and will touch on more on this in future blogs.

 

Here are 5 things to get you started!

 

How’s your schedule look?

 

1. Consider your schedule

 

If you’re offering more options to take makeup lessons, will you be able to

cover them?

 

Will you be opening up and offering new lessons or will they be joining lessons

that already exist?

 

If they’re able to join other classes, it might not affect anything. If you’re

creating a new class, how much will it cost you to open the new class? Is it

worth it?

 

Can you monetize it?

 

What extra value does this add for students? What is that added value worth?

For example, creating a super flexible membership level should come at a

premium.

 

How you advertise and market it is also key.

 

Premium: For the super busy businessman/woman, Mom or Dad whose

schedule often changes at the last minute due to responsibilities.

 

Basic: For those who have control over their schedule and come whenever

they want.

 

The way that you advertise and market the different membership types you

have will help your customers decide which tier they fall under. Worded

properly it will also help persuade them into buying one membership over the

other. People want to be looked at in certain ways.

 

How much time do you need to prepare for lessons?

 

2. Consider what goes into planning a lesson

 

How much time is spend tailoring lessons depending on who’s in your class?

 

This is especially important when determining the “How far in advance” rule.

 

This doesn’t affect some teachers, schools and systems.

 

How will the quality of lessons will be affected?

 

Will this reflect in my lessons?

 

How will this potentially be looked at by students? By this last question, if

you’re selling a premium lesson at a premium price and you’re allowing Jane

Doe to sign in for a lesson one minute before it starts … that isn’t going to look

like much of a premium lesson.

 

On the other hand if you’re offering a free conversation lesson, it won’t matter

as much.

 

How many students should I allow to take my class at the

same time?

 

3. Consider occupancy rates

 

Occupancy: What are the maximum number of seats in each class? How many

seats do you have to fill in order to break even?

 

If the maximum number of students per class is 4, how much profit will you

make?

 

“My two cents” tip: Do not try to pack in 10 or 12 students per class. Of course

this depends on the type of class that you’re offering.

 

Yes, there are methods and techniques to maximize student talking time in big

classes. On the other hand, the amount of quality feedback that you (or other

teachers) will be able to give them will be very limited. This does of course

depend on the type of lesson. Conversation based lessons demand more

immediate input and feedback from the teacher than a writing class (which

you can give written feedback after the class) Choose accordingly, but choose

wisely.

 

This is another example of how you might market lessons.

 

For example, “We only allow a maximum of 4 students per class in order to

maximize student talking time. We want to ensure there’s ample time to give

students immediate quality feedback.”

 

How many levels should my school have?

 

4. Consider your curriculum and level structure

 

How many levels does your school have? If you’re just starting out and offer

group classes, go lean.

 

This is an important thing to consider because if you offer makeup lessons,

you need to think about whether they’ll be too challenging.

 

If your school doesn’t have many levels, there will be more challenging going

from one level to next.

 

Generally speaking the more levels you offer, the easier the transition from

one level to the next.

 

However, keep in mind that the more levels you offer, the less likely you may

be to fill the seats until your student numbers increase.

 

The number of classes that you offer should reflect your student

demographics. In other words, how many students are false beginner,

beginner, low intermediate, etc.?

 

If you’re just opening your English school it’s wise to start with 2 or 3 levels

and tell students that you plan to add another level in “x” number of months.

 

There are many more things to consider, but these are 4 things that will get

you started when deciding whether or not students can cancel lessons.

 

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